Colby Fournier becomes Seekonk’s youngest Pro Stock winner. Rego gets redemption in Kraze’s 30/30 Street Stock feature. Brian Vincent wins Pro4 thriller. Vanasse and Cavallaro return to Victory Lane.

At the tender age of 17, Colby Fournier of Berkley, Mass, pulled off the first big win of his rookie Pro Stock Season by holding of a tenacious and hungry Tom Scully, Sr. for an entire race – 40 grueling laps, becoming the divisions’ youngest winner since the Pro Stocks began 33 years ago. Fournier came off the outside pole with Lowell’s Jason Ferreira on the low side.  The two battled briefly before Fournier had the lead coming out of turn two.   That’s when the Senior Scully attached himself to Fournier’s tail.  Somerset’s Kyle Casper got by Ferreira on lap 4 and Tom Scully, Jr. got past on lap 9.  The front four then wound the remainder of the 40 laps in position at a blistering pace.             Scully worked his rookie opponent high and low continuously, only to find Fournier’s resolve, skill and speed equal to the test.  While rookies often are flappable, Fournier maintained his course with the iron resolve of a seasoned Pro Stock charioteer.  As the duo dueled, places in the pack moved around.  Last week’s winner, Mike Brightman, had been put to fifteenth at the start for his win, and was moving painstakingly forward.  Division champion, Fred Astle of Westport, started tenth, and edged his way through the crowd to fifth by lap 11.  Rehoboth driver Dave Darling came up behind him on lap 13.  Brightman, from Acushnet, arrived at Darling’s bumper on the 27th circuit.  Brightman had relieved Bridgewater’s Dick Houlihan of that position, and Houlihan filled in behind.  Lap 42 saw Jake Vanada get by Ferreira for pursuit of Houlihan.  That left...

Dreams come ’round at Seekonk Speedway

Maybe next week, next year, next century at the historic family track By Paul KandarianGlobe Correspondent / May 29, 2011 SEEKONK — Speeding cars jockeyed for position, bumper to bumper, no one giving an inch. Seeing a glint of open space, a driver would hit the gas and swerve inside, barely missing the car he had cut off. The goal was to get ahead, and fast, to be the first in the mass of moving metal running in one thunderous, mechanized growl. This was not the Southeast Expressway at rush hour but a typical Saturday night at Seekonk Speedway near the Rhode Island border. Said to be the longest continually operated track in the country, the speedway is a family-run stock-car racing facility that has been going strong since 1946, when the Venditti family started it. “It’s a place families come, have some fun, get away from the real world for a while,’’ said Francis Venditti, 69, son of the late founder, D. Anthony Venditti. Francis runs it now with his nephew David. “Americans still have a love of the automobile,’’ Venditti said. On any Saturday night of the 26-week season up to two dozen vehicles scream around the track, racing in various categories. Upward of 5,000 spectators line the metal bleachers that surround a one-third-mile oval track that has not changed much since the place opened. And neither has one financial fact: No one is getting rich racing. These are part-time racers, from all walks of life, engaging in an obsession that racer Gerry DeGasparre said, “is not a hobby, it’s a small monster.’’ “You definitely spend more than you make,’’...

Pro4 Modifieds return to Seekonk Speedway with Kraze’s Speed Equipment Street Stock 30/30.

For the first time in 2011, on June 4th, the Pro4 Modifieds will invade the track where it all began. Kraze’s Speed Equipment of Seekonk, MA will present the Pro4 Modifieds in their first of 4 visits on the season. In a season that has seen the last two Pro4 Modified events cancelled due to rain.                 Current points leader Kurt Vigeant and the rest of the competitors are anxious to get back on the track, and Seekonk has been a favorite of many teams, not to mention a track where several of them started their driving careers at. Rob Richardi, Derrek Anderson and Bill Jorres are all graduates of the Seekonk Youth Racing Association, while Robin Berghman, Stan Mertz and others have competed in some of the other divisions before finding their home with the Pro4 Modifieds.                 Also on tap will be one of the most anticipated and exciting races for the Street Stocks, the 4th Annual 30/30. A feature that starts up to 30 cars makes track position more important than most weeks. The benefit, however, is the 30 lap distance. This will give some of the heavy hitters some extra time to work through the heavy traffic that makes up the Street Stocks.                 Defending Street Champion Steve Axon is the only repeat winner this season, but he has had to work for them. Sparky Arsenault is coming off his first win this season, while Justin Travis and Joe Kohler are the other Street winners. Many have been getting close, such as Ryan Lineham, Rey Lovelace, Chris Rioux, Paul Lallier and several others. One of...

Astle dominates 66th Anniversary Pro Stock Main. Thompson breaks through in the Late Models, while Cavallaro and Axon repeat in Tyson Foods Night.

Reigning Pro Stock king Fred Astle, Jr. of Westport broke into the win column on the new season with a convincing win in the laps-added run celebrating Seekonk Speedway’s 66th anniversary.  The track had opened in May of 1946.  In addition to the added laps, was some added prize money, brought about by the Pro Stock feature’s rainout two weeks earlier.             Astle began the feature in the seventh slot, and worked his way slowly and carefully to the front, not arriving into the lead until the halfway point, lap 33.  But from the moment he surged into the lead, the afterburners came on and Flyin’ Freddie Astle was in his element.  Late in the race he had better than a half-lap lead over his nearest competitor.  It wasn’t until a lap 64 spin brought out the caution that a following car was anywhere near the rocketing number 30.  Over the final 2 laps, Tom Scully, Jr. of Saunderstown, RI, pursued the streaking Astle to no avail.  He crossed the line .627 seconds behind the winner.   Rounding out the top 5 were Somerset driver Kyle Casper, Rehoboth’s Dave Darling, the current points leader, and Dick Houlihan of Bridgewater.             Bobby Tripp of Westport, winner of his previous three qualifiers, led off at the pole with Jake Vanada of Berkley on the outside.  Kyle Casper and Houlihan made up the second row with Tom Scully, Sr. and Tom Scully, Jr. in the row behind.  Astle and Taunton driver Ken Spencer followed.             Tripp went to the front as the green fell, with Kyle Casper getting under Vanada and Scully, Sr....

Dave Darling, Matt Breault, Justin Travis and Mike Cavallaro start the season off right at The ‘Konk.

Rehoboth’s Dave Darling made opening day his own once again, taking over at midrace and building a solid lead through to the checkered flag.  Darling likes the big race scenario, and this continued the momentum he had set up, winning 2010’s year-ending Venditti Memorial.                 Westporter Fred Astle, the 2010 division champ, finished second, .668 second back.  Mike Brightman, Tom Scully, Jr. and Ken Spencer filled out the top five.  Spencer chased them across the line in sixth.                 Kevin Casper and Brightman made up the front row for the start, followed by Spencer and Darling; Astle and Scully, Jr. were the third row.                 At the drop of the green, Casper stutter-stepped, giving Brightman the good start to run to the front.  Darling latched onto his tail and the chase was on.  Casper, Scully, Jr, Spencer and Astle pursued.                 On lap 5, Brightman still led the group; Astle had moved past Spencer for fifth place.    Spencer was forced into the infield grass through 3 and 4, but was able to keep straight and keep going, coming back onto the track at the head of the front stretch.                 Lap 10 saw Brightman still leading Darling with Spencer third and Astle behind him.  By lap 13, Darling had pulled in and was all over Brightman’s rear bumper.  On the following circuit, Darling moved along side and began to edge ahead.  By lap 15, he had command of the front.  Spencer and Astle continued to follow Brightman.                 Darling pulled out to a five car lead and Spencer was worrying Brightman; Astle was 3 cars back.  Five laps later,...